Women’s March On D.C.

Hundreds of thousands of men and women descended into the nation’s capital, meeting in the National Mall on Saturday, to show their support for women’s rights a day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated. What began as a Facebook post by a Hawaii grandmother the day after Hillary Clinton’s loss in November’s election, blossomed into a massive protest uniting people of all ages, races, and religions who crowded downtown Washington. They called for a “revolution” as a bulwark against the new administration and the Republican-led Congress who they fear will roll back reproductive, civil, and human rights.

However, some voiced their opposition to the new president. An estimated one million people attended the massive march according to D.C.’s Deputy Mayor for Public Safety and Justice who cited the event’s organizers. Those who participated in the Women’s March on Washington said the event was much more peaceful and positive than the protests during Friday’s inauguration.

The five hour rally featured speakers ranging from Ilyasah Shabazz, a daughter of Malcom X, to Sister Simone Campbell, a Catholic nun, to the music superstar, Madonna. People arrived in buses or flew across country from locales as far as California to bring the main arteries of downtown Washington to a near standstill. While the event’s organizers sought to highlight many concerns, including climate change and criminal justice reform, the speakers were united in imploring the crowd to begin taking action by donating to progressive causes and even running for public office once they return home.

But the marching was not contained only to our nation’s capital. According to a sister march webpage, an estimated 2.6 million people took part in 673 marches in all 50 states and 32 countries, from Belarus to New Zealand. The crowds were so large in some cities, though, that marching was almost impossible.

The Women’s March organization is also planning many other events, calling it “10 Actions/100 Days,” including “A Day Without a Woman” and writing postcards to senators about women’s rights.

Hundreds of thousands of men and women descended into the nation’s capital, meeting in the national mall on Saturday, to show their support for women’s rights a day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated. What began as a Facebook post by a Hawaii grandmother the day after Hillary Clinton’s loss in November’s election blossomed into a massive protest uniting people of all ages, races and religions who crowded downtown Washington. They called for a “revolution” as a bulwark against the new administration and the Republican-led Congress they fear will roll back reproductive, civil and human rights. But some voiced their opposition to the new president. An estimated 1 million people attended the massive march, D.C.’s deputy mayor for public safety and justice said, citing the event’s organizers. Those who participated in the Women’s March on Washington said the event was much more peaceful and positive than the protests during Friday’s inauguration.

A five-hour rally featured speakers ranging from Ilyasah Shabazz, a daughter of Malcom X, to Sister Simone Campbell, a Catholic nun, and the music superstar Madonna. People arrived in buses or flew across country from locales as far as California to bring the main arteries of downtown Washington to a near standstill. While the event’s organizers sought to highlight many concerns, including climate change and criminal justice reform, the speakers were united in imploring the crowd to begin taking action by donating to progressive causes and even running for public office once they return home.

But the marching was not contained only to our nation’s capital. According to a sister march webpage, an estimated 2.6 million people took part in 673 marches in all 50 states and 32 countries, from Belarus to New Zealand. The crowds were so large in some cities, though, that marching was almost impossible.

The Women’s March organization is also planning many other events, calling it “10 Actions/100 Days”, including “A Day Without a Woman” and writing postcards to senators about women’s rights. They see it as very important for women to continue to participate in politics and make their voices heard, especially in a time when they are at risk of marginalization.

Katie Weinzierl ’17

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